People in Edinburgh are being asked to share their view of the draft 2030 Climate Strategy, which sets out how Edinburgh will work together to  become a net zero, climate ready city by 2030.

The strategy envisions that by 2030, citizens will be able to have their needs met locally, reducing the need for travel, communities will be protected from the impacts of climate change by a network of green and blue routes across the city, which also encourage plants and wildlife to flourish and that heat and energy needs of citizens and businesses will be met through new heat networks, and energy efficient buildings.

Citizens businesses and organistaions across the city are already taking important steps to transition Edinburgh to a net zero Capital. This strategy outlines how we can go further together to take action at the speed and scale required to deliver our targets.

It outlines support for collaboration to ensure the city  can work together effectively  to invest in a better future for the everyone and calls on Scottish Government to support the city’s transition progressive legislative, regulatory and financial incentives.

The strategy also outlines how the Council will work with our partners to create the right frameworks and support for citizens to take action directly in their everyday lives.

Over the next 12 weeks, the public can share comments and opinions on the strategy by taking part in the consultation online. There will also be opportunities to meet the teams involved and find out more about the plans at a number of online drop-in sessions over the summer months.

Council Leader Councillor Adam McVey said:

“This strategy sets out a roadmap for the Capital to help our businesses, public sector, organisations and residents across our communities reduce or remove their carbon footprint to help us get to net-zero by 2030- which will be a hugely ambitious task.

“The plan aims to create the right conditions to unlock the opportunities that climate action presents, creating jobs and a more sustainable economy while we preserve our amazing Capital for future generations.

“The best recovery from Covid-19 will be one which is green and fair and makes our city resilient to future challenges. If we act now, with pace, we will realise the future Edinburgh and its residents deserve and set in place a legacy of climate action which will go far beyond COP26.”

Depute Council Leader, Councillor Cammy Day said:

“These proposed changes will affect everyone who lives in, works in and visits Edinburgh, so it’s only right that we continue to have a conversation with our residents, businesses and other stakeholders about how our city grows and changes to meet future needs.

“We will also work closely with the Edinburgh Climate Commission and Poverty Commission to integrate their work in the final strategy.

“We want everyone to play their part in these decisions, and I look forward to engaging with the public on this strategy, which offers a huge opportunity to invest in net zero action and ensure our young people inherit a thriving, sustainable city which is a cleaner and healthier place to live and work.”

The draft 2030 Climate Strategy was approved for consultation by the Policy and Sustainability Committee last week. It focuses on creating the right policy, regulatory and infrastructure conditions in the city to support net zero behaviour change.

It also lays out key areas where collaboration and partnership will be supported to deliver on Edinburgh’s climate targets.

To help the public have their say on the plan and to speak to experts, a number of online drop-in events will be help throughout the 12-week consultation. These will be supplemented by face to face drop in sessions in public spaces, should Covid restrictions on public gatherings be lifted over the course of the summer.

  • 30 June 2-5pm
  • 20 July 7-9pm
  • 14 August 11-1pm
  • 2 September 9-11 am

Consultation responses will form the basis of a finalised strategy which would be brought to Committee later in the year alongside an implementation plan and initial cost analysis.

Register for one of the public drop-in sessions

Visit the Consultation Hub to fill in the draft 2030 Climate Strategy.

If your business is looking for support in implementing sustainable practices or to start a research project focusing on sustainability there are many sustainable funding opportunities you could apply for.

Please find below details and information about application deadlines for some sustainable funding mechanisms which are open at the moment.

Funder Title   Opening Date Closing Date Website
Scottish Government Brewers Support Fund Open https://findbusinesssupport.gov.scot/service/funding/brewers-support-fund

 

UK Research and Innovation Smart Sustainable Packaging Challenge  Demonstrator Round 2 Open https://www.ukri.org/our-work/our-main-funds/industrial-strategy-challenge-fund/clean-growth/smart-sustainable-plastic-packaging-challenge/
UK Research and Innovation Smart Sustainable Packaging Challenge Business-Led R&D projects 29th March https://www.ukri.org/our-work/our-main-funds/industrial-strategy-challenge-fund/clean-growth/smart-sustainable-plastic-packaging-challenge/
Interface Standard Innovation Vouchers(5K) Open https://interface-online.org.uk/how-we-can-help/funding/standard-innovation-vouchers
Interface Student Placement Vouchers (£5K) Open https://interface-online.org.uk/how-we-can-help/funding/student-placement-innovation-vouchers
Interface Advanced Innovation Vouchers (£20K) Open https://interface-online.org.uk/how-we-can-help/funding/advanced-innovation-vouchers
Scottish Institute for Remanufacturing Scottish Institute for Remanufacturing (£5K-£50K) Open https://www.scot-reman.ac.uk/funding/sir-reference-documents-for-funding-applications/
Government Energy Entrepreneurs Fund (EEF) Phase 8A Open 30th March https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/apply-for-the-energy-entrepreneurs-fund-phase-8a
Innovate UK Knowledge Transfer Partnership Open https://www.ktp-uk.org/
The Business of Fashion Textiles and Technology Partnership SME R&D Support Programme Open 29th March https://bftt.org.uk/sme-support-programme/
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Sustainable Manufacturing Open 20th April 4pm https://www.ukri.org/opportunity/sustainable-manufacturing/
Innovate UK and The Office for Zero Emission Vehicles Infrastructure solutions for zero emission vehicles Open 21st April https://www.ukri.org/opportunity/infrastructure-solutions-for-zero-emission-vehicles/
Innovate UK IETF deployment of energy efficiency technologies Open 14th July https://www.ukri.org/opportunity/ietf-deployment-of-energy-efficiency-technologies-spring-2021/
Scottish Enterprise Green Jobs Funding Call (£50K-500K) 18th May 15th July https://www.scottish-enterprise.com/support-for-businesses/funding-and-grants/business-grants/green-jobs

To find out further information please contact circulareconomy@edinburghchamber.co.uk

Scandinavian know-how allied to Scotland’s new can-do attitude to tackling the issue of drinks containers is set to help take a big step forward in our quest to become a Circular Economy.

RVM Systems, a world-leading designer, manufacturer and supplier of reverse vending machines, is one of the firms leading the charge to tackle the scourge of our throwaway approach to cans and bottles. RVM Systems are the leading manufacturer from Sweden and one of a number of companies supplying technology for Deposit Return Schemes Globally.

Working with retail partners and others including Circular Edinburgh, the company is working with a number of retail partners to pilot a deposit return scheme planned to roll out nationally across Scotland in July 2022. Zero Waste Scotland have designed the Deposit Return Scheme on behalf of the Scottish Government.

And, based on their experience, they expect to see more and more environmentally conscious Scots return their ‘empties’ for cash. The way we traditionally design, build, use then dispose of products means that a lot goes to waste. A circular economy looks to keep the flow of materials and products within the economy for as long as possible, extracting the maximum value from them whilst in use.

The Circular Edinburgh project is supported as part of Zero Waste Scotland’s Resource Efficient Circular Economy Accelerator Programme, which will invest £73m in circular economy and resource efficiency projects, thanks to support from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). This programme provides funding and support for small and medium sized businesses in Scotland to be more resource efficient and create a more circular economy.

RVM Systems supplies deposit return s

RVM Systems head office is in Sweden, R&D in Norway, production in Estonia, and now owns companies in Finland, France, Estonia, Romania and the UK (based near Edinburgh in Broxburn).

Jennifer Johnston-Watt, RVM Systems Group Brand Ambassador said: “We installed the first Reverse Vending Machines in Scotland and more widely in the UK with Tesco stores, Iceland Foods, Sainsbury’s and Morrisons Stores all of whom are piloting Deposit Return Scheme machines to assess the impact on store staff and time spent managing the systems.

“So far these pilots have been a huge success with one store n Scotland accepting over 2 million used drink containers and one machine accepting over 1 million drink cans and drink bottles.

“We have also supplied RVMs to several universities in Scotland and numerous businesses and Hospitals in the UK. From our large offices/warehousing and showroom in Broxburn and our Nationwide Installation and Maintenance Cover we have already built the infrastructure for a Country wide Deposit Return Scheme and also full coverage of England. Wales, and Northern Ireland.”

Scotland’s Deposit Return Scheme starts in July 2022. These schemes help fight littering, increase recycling and improve the quality of material collected for recycling as the materials are separated, compacted and non-contaminated, and this saves natural resources and energy, reduces pollution and lowers greenhouse gas emissions. It is also known to help encourage wider behaviour change, encouraging people to think more carefully around their actions.

Jennifer added: “Scandinavia is renowned as being at the forefront of responsible business. We want to help create a circular economy and improve resource efficiency through actions such as discouraging the use of single-use materials

“Deposit return schemes enable the producers to take responsibility for the drink cans and bottles that they place on the market, and we call this Extended Producer Responsibility.”

It was confirmed last month by Rebecca Pow that a UK wide Deposit Return Scheme will start shortly after the Scottish Deposit Return Scheme.

Jennifer added: “Scotland is again leading the UK in terms of moving towards a more sustainable future, and we are pleased to bring our expertise to help achieve greater Circular Economy thinking. This will create business opportunities and also help to  provide a more sustainable environment.”

For further information please visit https://www.edinburghchamber.co.uk/circular-edinburgh/ or contact Mayan Grace or Lauren Ridgley on 0131 221 2999 (option 5) or email circulareconomy@edinburghchamber.co.uk

Zero Waste Scotland supported the Scottish Government on the design of the Deposit Return Scheme.

Scotland’s Deposit Return Scheme starts in July 2022 with the rest of the UK expected to follow suit.

Corporate Moves and Recycle Scotland is a single source provider of commercial relocations, furniture installation services and ethical recycling services to businesses making a change within their current workplace or embarking on a move to new premises.

We provide a Commercial relocation service which is moving businesses from one location to another or moving people throughout their existing building which is sometimes termed as churn. This includes the movement of all office furniture and IT equipment (disconnecting and reconnecting).

The Recycle Scotland element provides sustainable and environmental solutions for the disposal of unwanted furniture fittings and equipment.

Helping clients tangibly achieve their CSR goals in an ethical way whilst protecting the environment.

Recycle Scotland’s core activities, aims and objectives are:

  • Refurbish / Re-engineer office furniture
  • Identifying opportunities to prevent waste by managing customers’ surplus product for reuse
  • Provide furniture rental to small businesses and the third sector who have a short-term requirement for office furniture
  • Recycling and recovery of core components
  • Recovery of base materials, wood, steel, plastic, fabric
  • We are a REVOLVE certified company

With facilities in Livingston and Aberdeen it means Corporate Moves are ideally positioned to service the whole of Scotland.

A business with its origins in tackling the devastating impact of period poverty on girls attending school in rural Kenya is now making its mark on the UK market – and it is doing so in Circular Economy style.

Lilypads may have begun life to tackle an issue in Kenya, but it is the brainchild of University of Edinburgh alumnus Alison Wood, and she continues to build its success from Scotland’s Capital.

She is engaging with a range of organisations and advisors, including Circular Edinburgh.

The way we traditionally design, build, use then dispose of products means that a lot goes to waste. A circular economy looks to keep the flow of materials and products within the economy for as long as possible, extracting the maximum value from them whilst in use.

The Circular Edinburgh project is supported as part of Zero Waste Scotland’s Resource Efficient Circular Economy Accelerator Programme, which will invest £73m in circular economy and resource efficiency projects, thanks to support from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). This programme provides funding and support for small and medium sized businesses in Scotland to be more resource efficient and create a more circular economy.

In creating an affordable, reusable, comfortable and efficient product, Lilypads is also tackling major environmental issues such as reducing plastic waste as well as the social issue of period poverty.

Alison said: “It began in rural Kenya about two years ago when, while working on a research project, I learned that women could not afford sanitary products and in desperation to remain in school some were exchanging them for sex.

“It changed my path in life. Since then we have worked to reduce the cost of manufacture through changing the design of sanitary pads, whilst ensuring they are a good fit and comfortable.”

A sanitary pad can contain up to 90% plastic. A year’s supply of “ordinary” sanitary pads can have the same CO2 emission as driving a small diesel car almost 60 kilometres. Much of this waste can end up in the sea or washed up on beaches. In rural Africa, disposing of plastic waste can be deeply challenging.

After learning about the level of plastic in disposable products, the business adapted their reusable product for the British market too. Alison added: “Sanitary products are an essential product and the most important criteria for most women is that it doesn’t leak and is comfortable. Alongside that there are also loads of women who are looking to reduce their environmental impact. We can see examples from reducing the plastic bottles we use to utilising public transport.

“However, for many women the prospect of swapping sanitary products is often difficult because it doesn’t fit into their lifestyle. That is why we are producing a product that’s very comfortable, well-fitted AND reusable so instead of being thrown out after each use it can be washed dried and reused for at least two years.”

Lily pads continues to work both overseas and also in the UK providing an affordable, comfortable and environmentally friendly sanitary product. They also provide puberty and mental health education in schools.

Alison would like to see more companies – particularly small businesses – encouraged to pursue the Circular Economy route through the creation of an ecosystem of help and advice to help navigate an easier path. The rewards, she believes, lie not only in improving our business impact on our environment, but also in improved commercial opportunities as more and more consumers are values driven.

For further information please visit https://www.edinburghchamber.co.uk/circular-edinburgh/ or contact Mayan Grace or Lauren Ridgley on 0131 221 2999 (option 5) or email circulareconomy@edinburghchamber.co.uk

www.lilypads.org.uk

You could be forgiven for thinking, as you relax in the tranquil and stylish surroundings of Eden Locke aparthotel in the heart of Edinburgh, that this luxury must come at a heavy price to the environment.

Fluffy towels, crisp linen, perfect pillows, friendly uniformed staff, the smell of fresh roasted coffee, lashings of delicious cakes and pastries – all in intelligent design-led style.

But you would be surprised. Because while Eden Locke is enormously committed to recycling to protect the environment as far as possible, this hospitality organisation, part of edyn, are now going beyond that and embracing Edinburgh’s growing circular economy, working with Circular Edinburgh.

The way we traditionally design, build, use then dispose of products means that a lot goes to waste. A circular economy looks to keep the flow of materials and products within the economy for as long as possible, extracting the maximum value from them whilst in use.

The Circular Edinburgh project is supported as part of Zero Waste Scotland’s Resource Efficient Circular Economy Accelerator Programme, which will invest £73m in circular economy and resource efficiency projects, thanks to support from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). This programme provides funding and support for small and medium sized businesses in Scotland to be more resource efficient and create a more circular economy.

Annabel Drysdale of Eden Locke said: “All the suppliers we use are local as we are intent on supporting the local community. The cakes and pastries we sell in the café, the cookies we put in our rooms even our coffee, is roasted in Fife. Our alcohol suppliers are all from Scotland (Thurso, Banchory, Arran, Dalkeith, Dunbar and Edinburgh).

“We only change towels every three days, linen every 7 days, thus saving on detergent and wasteful water. It controls our labour costs and ensures the housekeepers have different tasks in each room they are assigned each day. The local laundry company we work with use sustainable products.

“Our toiletries are bespoke to Locke and we plan to put large pump action, refillable bottles in all the rooms. Even our toilet paper uses environmentally friendly materials. We repair and remanufacture our IT equipment to lengthen time of use. “

The circular economy is something constantly considered at Eden Locke. Old pillows are donated to Edinburgh Dog and Cat home for example, and detergent bottles are refilled rather than discarded.

Annabel added: “There are many practical ways to engage with the circular economy that are easy to implement and cause no extra work, or are not in any detrimental way to the quality service we offer.”

The business is trying to find ways to reuse its used coffee grinds and its unused food, and is in discussions with local organisations to see how this can best be achieved. It is currently speaking to Olio about sharing their unused food.

Annabel added: “As a city, I think there is more potential for companies to work together on the circular economy.

“There is always the option for some change. Everyone doing a little is the start. Whether moving away from plastic bags, or recycling paper, or using the most environmentally friendly ways available to travel are all good steps. Perhaps the beginning is to consider all waste – what can be reused, fixed, donated, before discarding it is a good start.”

“We have to consider this from the top down and the bottom up. How we run our infrastructure, our building materials, transportation and how we run our public services is all for experts in their fields to discuss with the government.

“Individuals can help make it work from the bottom up, with households doing all they can to reuse and recycle.”

For further information please visit https://www.edinburghchamber.co.uk/circular-edinburgh/ or contact Mayan Grace or Lauren Ridgley on 0131 221 2999 (option 5) or email circulareconomy@edinburghchamber.co.uk

Pioneering Circular Economy thinking is in with the bricks at one innovative company – based in Edinburgh – that is setting new standards in the construction industry.

Heriot-Watt University spin-out business Kenoteq manufactures ground-breaking building products for the construction industry. The company’s first product is an unfired brick called the K-Briq, made from over 90% recycled demolition and construction waste material.

Kenoteq has received funding and support from Zero Waste Scotland, Scottish Enterprise, the Construction Scotland Innovation Centre and the Royal Academy of Engineering. It is the only named product in the SEPA Housing Sector Plan 2019.

The way we traditionally design, build and use products means that a lot goes to waste. A circular economy looks to keep the flow of materials and products in use for as long as possible, extracting the maximum value from them.

The Circular Edinburgh project is supported as part of Zero Waste Scotland’s Resource Efficient Circular Economy Accelerator Programme, funded by the Scottish Government and European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). This programme provides funding and support for small and medium sized businesses in Scotland to be more resource efficient and create a more circular economy.

Kenoteq is excited to work with Circular Edinburgh and promote circular economy in the City.

Dr Sam Chapman of Kenoteq said: “The circular economy is the future of all physical products in our eyes. As raw materials, resources and space reduces through our ever-expanding consumption, re-use and recycling is vital to ensure continued development and progress. Cities will be mines of the future for construction, especially in already highly-developed countries. It also offers opportunities for synergies and new business models between sectors previously un-connected. The circular economy isn’t AN opportunity, it is THE opportunity.”

K-Briq produces 1/10th of the CO2 emissions of a traditional fired brick during its manufacture and uses 1/11th of the energy during production. It also offers double the insulation properties of existing bricks and blocks, thereby providing a tool for increased energy efficiency to architects and construction companies. It also uses no cement, does not need painting or surface treatment, and is fully recyclable as inert construction waste at end of life.

K-Briq is produced onsite at a recycling centre, thereby reducing the travel miles involved in its production.

“Up to 85 per cent of bricks used in Scotland are currently being imported from England or Europe raising considerable questions about the long-term sustainability of the sector. We want to see this change as Scotland works towards lower emission and higher recycling targets.”

Dr Chapman believes more companies can engage with the circular economy; “In our view, it is straightforward if your suppliers and input materials come from regulated and relatively local places. In particular, product manufacturers can highlight both their requirements for certain grade material, and also their waste services requirements. In an ideal world, this would be mapped for regions, regardless of industry, to fully understand material flows into and out of areas.”

Knowledge and research are key to ensuring we continue to make progress, he added: “Scotland needs to keep supporting start-ups and R&D programmes in this area, while also ensuring regulations continue to push all businesses further towards sustainability and circular economy thinking. Scotland’s scale gives it a huge advantage in developing the structures required to understand material flows in and out of a region, in order to find big wins and opportunities for delivering on sustainability goals.”

Zero Waste Scotland leads on delivery of the £73 million Resource Efficient Circular Economy Accelerator Programme, which aims to improve the economic performance of SMEs while at the same time reducing the impact of economic activity on the natural environment, supporting Scottish Government and EU policies.

For further information please visit https://www.edinburghchamber.co.uk/circular-edinburgh/ or contact Mayan Grace or Lauren Ridgley on 0131 221 2999 (option 5) or email circulareconomy@edinburghchamber.co.uk

The University of Edinburgh is working closely with Zero Waste Scotland to explore the opportunity to establish a Circular Economy Innovation Centre in Edinburgh. The Centre would provide opportunities for businesses, third sector organisations, policy makers, academics and others to come together to exchange knowledge, develop skills and create partnerships to increase circular economy innovation and practice across the city region and beyond.

The University is now seeking feedback from stakeholders about a range of activities associated with the proposed Centre. If your organisation has an interest in, or is involved with, the circular economy we would very much like to capture your views. Please complete this survey if you are the designated circular economy lead and/or main decision-maker in your organisation or business unit or ask a relevant colleague to complete it on your behalf. The deadline for responses is Friday 4th October. Please contact Lucy Stanfield (lucy.stanfield@ed.ac.uk) for further information.  https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/CircEcon19

One Edinburgh charity which tackles the causes and consequences of homelessness believes working in a circular economy is a natural progression for an organisation which puts people at the heart of all it does…

Cyrenians maintain their person-centred approach leads naturally towards working in collaboration with other organisations, being involved in innovative projects that almost inevitably follow circular economy thinking.

Their creative and effective projects around reducing food waste and tackling food poverty are a shining example of a circular economy in action, and they believe many more businesses and organisations could benefit from working with Circular Edinburgh to embrace the circular economy.

The way we traditionally design, build and use products means that a lot of it goes to waste. A circular economy looks to keep the flow of materials and products within the economy for as long as possible, extracting the maximum value from them whilst in use.

Circular Edinburgh is a joint initiative delivered by Zero Waste Scotland and Edinburgh Chamber of Commerce, with funding support from the European Regional Development Fund.

Ewan Aitken, Chief Executive of Cyrenians said: “Through our FareShare Depot, which collects surplus but good quality food from retailers that might otherwise be thrown out, we redistribute food that might have been sent to landfill – over 410 tonnes of food in the past year alone.  We distribute this to over 100 community organisations and charities within the Central and South East Scotland Area, supplying almost 1,000,000 meals benefitting over 15,000 people who are living in food insecurity each week.

“Additionally, diverting this food from landfill contributes to our environment with a possible saving of over 1700 tonnes of CO2 emissions. When food does end up rotting in landfill, it emits methane, a gas many times worse for the environment than CO2. For organisations this approach immediately achieves results; the money saved from buying low-cost and high quality food means more can be spent on service delivery. This not only benefits the individuals eating the meals, but the wider community.”

Through its Food Education project, Cyrenians are educating people in reducing household waste by teaching them the skills to cook healthy meals with food that would otherwise be disposed of, contributing towards their wellbeing, food insecurity and social isolation through cooking classes within communities. As part of the course, participants are taught to budget in addition to a section on saving energy and the resultant costs.

Ewan added: “Scotland has a vision to reduce food waste by 33% by 2025 and for 70% of waste to be recycled by the same year.

“Beyond food we need to facilitate small circles within our economy – encouraging the development of local supply chains and partnerships between businesses and the third  sector. For example, using third sector training within a business reaps more than just a sense of supporting a worthy cause and providing valuable financial support to the charity; it also sends a clear message to the employees that their employer is committed to supporting their local community. These seemingly small circles are really part of a much bigger, global cycle that values food, people and the planet we share. We believe in the power of meaningful purpose as an incredible economic driver.”

Circular Edinburgh is a joint initiative delivered by Zero Waste Scotland and the Edinburgh Chamber of Commerce, supported by funding from both the Scottish Government and the European Regional Development Fund through the £73million Resource Efficient Circular Economy Accelerator Programme. Circular Edinburgh delivers a programme of knowledge sharing events, workshops and roundtable discussions to promote the ‘Circular Economy’ to local businesses.

For further information please visit https://www.edinburghchamber.co.uk/circular-edinburgh/ or contact Mayan Grace or Lauren Ridgley on 0131 221 2999 (option 5) or email circulareconomy@edinburghchamber.co.uk

Scots are recycling more food waste than ever with the total volume and its associated carbon savings leaping by more than 40% in recent years, according to new reports published by Zero Waste Scotland.

Findings from the Scottish anaerobic digestion (AD) and biogas sector survey 2017, as well as the Scottish composting sector survey 2017, show a significant rise in the amount of recycled food waste. Approximately 158,500 tonnes of household and commercial solid food waste was collected in 2017, compared with the 2013 figure of 111,500 tonnes.

People and businesses are increasingly doing their bit to help the planet as the additional increase in food waste sent for recycling (47,000 tonnes) has prevented the release of 41,500 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent being released into the atmosphere, as it has been saved from the general waste bin. The figure is the equivalent of taking 22,004 cars off the road in the UK for a year or driving around the world 5829 times.

Producing electricity, heat and gas from food waste through AD allows us to capture the energy stored in our food that would otherwise be sent to landfill or incinerated. Using this waste helps to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels.

Iain Gulland, Chief Executive of Zero Waste Scotland, said:

“Scotland should be proud, the recycling of more food waste into sustainable energy is an incredible achievement. The rise in recycled food waste is welcome news for Scotland’s economy and for the planet. When we waste food, we also waste the resources that went into growing, processing, transporting and packaging it, so it is hugely important that we use what we have. Of course, some food waste is inevitable – we can’t escape waste of items like fruit and vegetable peel.

“This result is fantastic, but think of all the energy that can be produced from the rest of our unavoidable food waste. We are living through a climate emergency and individuals can have a great impact without even leaving the kitchen by simply using their food waste caddy.”

The rise has been helped by the introduction of the Waste (Scotland) Regulations 2012 compelling businesses to recycle food waste. As of 2016, Scottish businesses producing more than 5kg of food waste per week have been required to present food waste separately for collection. The increase has also been supported by a growth in the availability of food recycling facilities to Scottish households via their local council, 80% of Scottish households now have access to food waste recycling.

Scotland will have one of the most ambitious climate change laws in the world after committing to a target of net-zero emissions by 2045.

Previous research from Zero Waste Scotland warns that food waste is worse than plastic for climate change. Food waste is a greater cause of global warming because of all the resources and energy that goes into growing and making the food in the first place. If wasted food is then sent to landfill, the impacts are even worse as this produces and emits methane, one of the most damaging greenhouse gases. In the short-term, methane is many times worse than carbon dioxide.

Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham said:

“I am pleased to see a growing number of people across the country taking action to reduce food waste. Scotland’s response to the global climate emergency must be a shared, national endeavour – we all need to do our bit to safeguard the planet for future generations – and reducing and recycling food waste is an easy but important way to do just this.

“Our Food Waste Reduction Plan, launched in April, provides more information on the clear environmental and economic benefits of reducing food waste. I’d urge everyone who hasn’t already done so to consider a small change in their daily routine to make a big difference to the battle against climate change. We all need to work together to end Scotland’s contribution to climate change and seize the opportunities that creates.”

The news follows the announcement that the UK is now using more electricity generated from renewable sources than coal for the first time ever. In 2017, the Scottish AD sector produced an estimated 245,520 MWh of electricity. Around a third came from food waste, enough to power nearly 20,000 homes.